Grand Theft Auto V has two playable stock exchanges

I suppose it’s always good for people to learn how the stock market works. Kevin Roose has a look at the exchanges, and a recent effort to manipulate the markets.

• There are two playable stock exchanges inside GTA V: LCN and BAWSAQ. On each of these exchanges, you can buy and sell stocks using the virtual cash you amass during the course of the game. (This cash has no real-world value, but it can be used to buy houses, airplane hangars, and other cool things inside the game.)

• Most of the time, these stock prices appear to move randomly. But in certain missions, your character is given a tip that, due to an in-game event (usually, an assassination of a CEO), a company’s stock is about to rise or fall precipitously. When this happens, you’re supposed to load up on the stock (or its competitor’s stock), kill the CEO, then profit from your trades.

• Rockstar Games, the makers of GTA V, have hinted (but never confirmed) that BAWSAQ, the second exchange, might be dynamic — in other words, it might move in response to the actions of other GTA V players, whose trades feed into a central online database. If thousands of players around the world happen to buy a bunch of guns simultaneously, the theory went, the BAWSAQ might reflect that activity by raising the price of Ammu-Nation stock (Ammu-Nation being the store where guns are purchased).

• There is no penalty for insider trading or securities fraud in Grand Theft Auto.

Grand Theft Auto V has two playable stock exchanges

Super long Tetris read

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How many words do you want to read about Tetris? If the answer is ‘all of them,’it’s your lucky day. Noah Davis has a long, great piece on The Verve, an excellent history of the game, and worth clicking through to just to see the pictures.

But the one-touch future also means the gaming world will continue to evolve past Tetris. It is a game rooted in the technology and limitations of the 1980s and 1990s. The move to touchscreens and gesture-based systems like Kinect will take future versions of Tetris further away from the core of the game. BPS, EA, and the rest of the licensees are attempting to shoehorn something that relies on buttons into a touchscreen world. (It’s not just Tetris; think how many beloved games from the past don’t translate.) They managed to make a fun and reasonably faithful version, but the fact remains that while One-Touch Tetris shares some DNA with the original, it’s an entirely different species. New developments in technology are making the old game just that: a thing of the past that doesn’t quite fit in the future.

Undated. The Tetris Saga. Atari HQ.
Undated. Tetris Story by Vadim Gerasimov. Vadim.Oversigma.com.
January, 1988. New Software Game: It comes from Soviet. NY Times.
May, 1994. This is your brain on Tetris. Wired.
March, 1996. The Tetris Effect. Do Computer Games Fry Your Brain? Philadelpha CityPaper.
September, 1999. Creator of Tetris Looks for New Ways to Dazzle and Beguile. NY Times.
October 2000. Tetris Dreams. Scientific American.
April, 2006. Tetris from the Top: An interview with Henk Rogers. Nindendo World Report.
October, 2007. Q&A: Tetris creator Alexey Pajitnov. Gamespot.com.
June, 2009. Tetris turns 25. CNN.
June, 2009. How Tetris conquered the world block by block. Guardian.
June, 2009. Making Histroy with Tetris. About.com
June, 2009. Interview: Alexey Pajitnov, creator of Tetris. Joystiq.com
June, 2010. Alexey Pajitnov – Tetris: Past, Present, Future. Gamasutra.
November, 2011. After 27 Years, Tetris Still Putting The Pieces Together. TPM.
November, 2011. The Tetris Effect. The Awl.
April, 2012. Just One More Game. NY Times.

Super long Tetris read