Just like Apple

Daring Fireball recently linked to a New Yorker article about the interesting corporate structure of the Green Bay Packers. In it, this sentence:

Shareholders receive no dividend check and no free tickets to Lambeau Field. They don’t even get a foam cheesehead. All they get is a piece of paper that says they are part-owners of the Green Bay Packers.

“Huh”, I thought, “Just like Apple.” But then I found this:

People who own shares of of GBP stock cannot be sold to others–it can only be sold back to the team. The stock doesn’t appreciate in value, no dividends are paid, and there are no season ticket privileges. However, the stock certificate is really cool, and you can proudly say you own part of a professional football team!

Just like Apple

10 Things Chicago Athletes Aren’t Allowed To Do

This list pretty much sums up my thoughts on the Jay Cutler fiasco. Click through for the rest.

10. Show too much emotion.
9. Show too little emotion.
8. Get injured.
7. Play while injured and make your injury worse.
6. Play while injured and try to avoid making your injury worse.

Somebody shared this in Google Reader, but now I can’t find who.

10 Things Chicago Athletes Aren’t Allowed To Do

Inside Baseball

The Baseball Hall of Fame just announced this year’s class of inductees, and there were some notable names missing. Here’s Nate Silver on the numbers. His point is basically that good baseball players today are better than great baseball players of yesteryear.

If you’re not willing to reserve a place for players who meet or exceed the statistical standards of the average Hall of Famers at their positions, however — players like a Larkin or a Bagwell — the discussion really ought to turn to which players we need to kick out. No Barry Larkin? No Travis Jackson. No Tim Raines? No Max Carey. No Jeff Bagwell? No High Pockets Kelly. No Trammell and Whitaker? That’s fine: let’s boot Tinker and Evers.

Barry Larkin and Jeff Bagwell, 2 players who didn’t make it but should have, are indicative of how people vote now. Barry Larkin didn’t make it because he was merely spectacular for close to a decade, not eye poppingly amazing, during an era of steroid use. Jeff Bagwell, on the other hand, had amazing stats, also during an era of steroid use. It seems like Larkin is being compared unfavorably in light of ballooning offensive stats, for not doing steroids. On the other hand, Bagwell is being punished for having those stats during the same era, even though there’s never been evidence of steroid abuse.

Inside Baseball

Brian Burke’s Advocacy

Brian Burke is a big name in NHL. His son’s recent death in car accident, soon after coming out, has turned him in to a very powerful advocate for gay athletes:

Mostly, though, he doesn’t want to believe he’s the worst possible person for the job that Brendan started, but he knows it’s true. He’s built a career on not blowing sunshine up his own ass and pretending he’s good at something he’s not. He knows that everything he needs now, to carry this water for Brendan, he doesn’t have. Brendan had it, the poise and natural charm, the easy passage between two worlds. Brendan was perfect for the job. Brendan went first. Now he has to go second.

Brian Burke’s Advocacy

Best save ever?

Watch the Man City keeper sprint the length of the field to prevent a goal by Manchester United. The guy is Usain Bolt fast. At least compared to the other players he is.

Via Jonah Keri, who never fails to fill my Google Reader Share folder with awesome stuff. By the way, Jonah has a book about the Rays coming out in March, and just launched a podcast you should be listening to if you like good stuff.

Best save ever?

What’s your opinion on this?

Recently, Tom Brady was in a car accident and all of New England held their breath. It turned out he was fine, but his car was pretty badly banged up. It turns out the $97K Audi S8, was a loaner vehicle registered to a non-profit, Best Buddies, on whose board Tom Brady sits. Is this an issue? Joanna Weiss in the Globe thinks it might be.

Audi is supporting Best Buddies by giving them loaner cars. Presumably, Audi wouldn’t be replacing these cars with a check. Presumably, Best Buddies can’t really use 12 $100K cars at once and lets their board members drive the left overs…

I just can’t get fired up about this. Audi wanted to support an org by giving them cars. The org wants the support of the corporation and takes the cars. The board member drives one of these cars. Maybe it’s not pure, but neither is it especially unethical. What do you think?

What’s your opinion on this?