Google Reader is shutting down

Google announced yesterday they’re shutting down Google Reader, you’ve likely heard. A user base, which was probably never very big to begin with has been declining and Google wants to focus resources on a smaller amount of products. It has always seemed to me as though everyone I know online uses Google Reader or did once, and everyone I know offline doesn’t. And there’s your problem. Personally, I was still using GR at least once or twice a day, but my use has dwindled until now I really only use it for 4 or 5 sites, even though I can’t bear to unsubscribe from the others.

There will be alternatives offered in the next couple months, and since Google shut down Share a couple years ago, Reader hasn’t been as fun or useful. As an aside, Google is completely within their rights to shut down any of their products, but why would anyone start using Google+ at this point? Won’t that get shut down someday, too?

In any case, if you’re using Google Reader to follow Unlikely Words, consider following along on Twitter.

Google Reader is shutting down

Google Reader, Like, Follow, Share

4 different people mentioned to me today that I ended up in their Google Reader at some point and they wanted to know why. I had noticed that certain articles I was scanning were “liked” by people I didn’t know, which I thought was weird. Obviously, Google made a change. To me it looks like a strike against both Facebook AND Twitter. Not only are you able to connect with and read the articles shared by people you do know (Facebook), but you’ll be able to do the same with people you don’t know, as well (Twitter). Seems like a good idea to me.

Oh, and you’re damn right I’m gonna “share” this, Captain Obvious, you better “like” it.

Google Reader, Like, Follow, Share

Share RSS Feeds on Google Reader?

In the last year, I’ve convinced 5 or 6 people to start using RSS in general and Google Reader specifically. Without a doubt, one of the first questions they ask after understanding the technology is, “OK, what feeds should I read now.” I think what happens is people recognize what they’ll be able to do with RSS (follow their favorite websites) and they want to do more of it.

Google makes it easy to share specific items from your feeds with your friends, going so far as to give you a personalized page with your shared items on it (careful, you might just start a blog by accident). However, there’s currently no way to share which feeds you’re subscribed to making it hard to truly evangelize this product. Get on that Google.

Share RSS Feeds on Google Reader?

TiVo Guilt – The Opportunity Costs of Too Much TV

CNN says that people have too many programs saved on their TiVos

With infinite media, you have infinite choices, and therefore you have infinite opportunity costs,” he says. “Your satisfaction index of the thing you actually choose can never be equivalent to the infinite opportunity costs, so we’re in this position of being behind the cognitive eight-ball all the time.

I don’t even have a TiVo and this happens to me. We have to watch Dexter, True Blood, Californication, Weeds, we’re behind on 30 Rock and the Office and Friday Night Lights and I’ve just last night finished Generation Kill. Lost Season 4 ended last week for me. And those are just the shows with which we’re relatively caught up. What about BSG or The War or The IT Crowd?

I think this is like the RSS post Matt put up a couple days ago about getting rid of feeds he’s not interested in (read: doesn’t have time for) anymore. It hurts. Is RSS Bankruptcy a good option? Should people declare TiVo bankruptcy and burn the whole fucking place down?

What I really want to know is who will spearhead the TiVoZero movement, Merlin Mann is too busy tackling email.

TiVo Guilt – The Opportunity Costs of Too Much TV

RSS Runts

I have way too many feeds in my RSS reader—more blogs than I could read every day even before I had twins. Today I decided, screw it, I’m going to find one feed that I skip over every time, and just unsubscribe. I’m tired of the “mark all read” button in Google Reader.

To my surprise, I realized that the first candidate to go was Slashdot. Does this mean that I’ve completed my transformation from “tech guy” to “policy guy”? What does it mean that I just don’t care if Ubuntu is getting slower?

But enough about me. Discussion topic! What detritus does your RSS reader contain? What blogs did you used to enjoy but now find boring? What did you subscribe to and never read?

RSS Runts