“Nothing matters to anyone anymore but share potential”

Luke O’Neil, who seems to write pretty much every article on every site these days, calls bullshit on that stupid “How much does it cost to book your favorite band?” link that around this past week. Some acts seem way lower than they should be, some acts seem way higher than they should be, and there a lot of bands making more for one show than you made last year. O’Neil mentions a lot of sites who should know better shared the list anyway. Basically, this isn’t what your favorite band earns every night, it’s what your favorite band would charge to play at your Bar Mitzvah. Lastly, and smartly, O’Neil ties the sharing of this list to that Facebook dude cluelessly railing against viral media content.

This is exactly the sort of thing the Internet Thinking Apparatus was talking about yesterday in the wake of Facebook exec Mike Hudack’s anti viral media rant. Nothing matters to anyone anymore but share potential. Being able to affix a few famous musicians’ names and some big dollar figures to a headline under the guise of Data is a perfect recipe for viral success. It’s certainly worked here. The post is one of Priceonomics biggest traffic hits, with 1.2 million views as of this moment. Someone should put together a list of what traffic-worshipping sites charge for their integrity. A few ten thousand views seems to be about the going rate. That would be a huge viral hit.

“Nothing matters to anyone anymore but share potential”

Why? Because you’re a cow. Now shut up and consume your content.

Kent Brewster’s on Facebook’s design changes, or rather people complaining about them. Shades of, “If you are not paying for it, you’re not the customer; you’re the product being sold,” but a little more in your face. Props for posting it directly to FB, too.

Dear people who whine about interface changes on Facebook:

Unless you are paying money to advertise on Facebook, you are not a Facebook customer. As far as Facebook is concerned, you’re not even a human being. You are one of an infinite herd of cows. Facebook (and its faithful ranch-hand Zynga) spreads a thick layer of content for you every morning, you chew it up all day, and they milk you for your lovely creamy clicks every night.

Sure, you might have been calved on the nearby Yahoo or MySpace farms, and you might someday slip under the pasture fence to the greener grass of Google+, but in the end … you’re a cow. Moo all you want about how Facebook went and moved the damn salt lick again; they’re not going to listen.

Why? Because you’re a cow. Now shut up and consume your content.

Via Joshua Nguyen / Dens

Why? Because you’re a cow. Now shut up and consume your content.

Random Facebook pages showing up in my feed

The other day, I noticed a few items in my Facebook stream that I hadn’t “Liked”. I figured it was a glitch of some sort. Then it happened again today. I went and looked at my pages and there 10 or so pages I was subscribed to I’d never seen before and would never subscribe to. For instance, I found myself a fan of Phil Fischer, a Christian musician that just completed The Tea Party Song and is asking his fans for $113K so he can get it played on Christian radio. I emailed him to ask if he knew how I had ended up liking his page, and will update when I hear back. If you check his Facebook page, this seems to have happened to other people as well.

I couldn’t find much else online about this happening to other people, except for this post on Facebook support. If this happened to you or you see any other info about it, let me know because I’m curious.

Random Facebook pages showing up in my feed

A life in updates

Yesterday, I wrote about the lack of smartphone/internet/Facebook use by the main characters in contemporary movies and books (I may not have mentioned internet or Facebook or movies, but I meant to). In a discussion that followed, Nick mentioned the idea of a story told entirely in Facebook updates. Almost as if on queue, this video from Maxime Luere. An entire story told through status updates. Well done, too.

Via TDW.

A life in updates

Facebook is Google

In an article about Google’s recent surprise company-wide raise and bonus this about Facebook’s staff.

Of the more than 1,900 Facebook employees with resumes on LinkedIn, 300 — around 15% of Facebook’s staff — list Google as a past employer.

Is that a lot? Because it sounds like a lot to me. Also, the person that leaked the raise/bonus info to Business Insider got fired. They presumably will not be receiving a raise or a bonus. Unless they go work for Facebook.

Facebook is Google

10 Reasons To Delete Your Facebook Account

You name your post 10 Reasons To Delete Your Facebook Account and not am I going to click, I’m probably going to link to it, too! Click through for back up to all the bullet points. #9 is pretty important, and #4 and #1 are funny. Does anyone know what % of internet users AOL had at it’s peak and how that compares to the 400 Million accounts Facebook has right now?

10. Facebook’s Terms Of Service are completely one-sided.
9. Facebook’s CEO has a documented history of unethical behavior.
8. Facebook has flat out declared war on privacy.
7. Facebook is pulling a classic bait-and-switch.
6. Facebook is a bully.
5. Even your private data is shared with applications.
4. Facebook is not technically competent enough to be trusted.
3. Facebook makes it incredibly difficult to truly delete your account.
2. Facebook doesn’t (really) support the Open Web.
1. The Facebook application itself sucks.

10 Reasons To Delete Your Facebook Account

Facebook Analogy

You know why Facebook doesn’t care about your privacy? You know how if you’re a credit card customer that pays off your bills every month the credit card company can’t make any money off of you? If you lock up your activity on Facebook, you close your circle tight, and Facebook can’t use your information to help them beat Google. Why should they care about your privacy?

Facebook Analogy

Facebook Doesn’t Care About Your Privacy

Hahahaha. The motherfuckers at Facebook are doing it again. You maybe heard about their plan this week to Facebookify the web by making some social sites you’re a part of more social. And just like last time, Facebook’s default forces you to rely on yourself for your privacy. I don’t think most people care. Hell, I don’t even think I care. I DO have a pretty strong opinion of how you’re supposed to do something on the web, though, and this isn’t it.

Want to opt out of instant personalization? Make sure to block the applications:

How do I opt-out of instant personalization?
You can opt-out of instant personalization by disallowing it here. By clicking “No Thanks” on the Facebook notification on partner sites, partners will delete your data. To prevent your friends from sharing any of your information with an instant personalization partner, block the application: Microsoft Docs.com, Pandora, Yelp.

Newsweek Tumblr

Facebook Doesn’t Care About Your Privacy