Mad Men Season 7 Episode 3

Mad Men Art
Every week, Chris Piascik (@chrispiascik) illustrates a moment from the episode and I write up a recap.

Episode title “Field Trip.” This refers to Don’s trip to LA, Betty’s trip to the farm, and sort of Don’s trip back to the office.

I missed any clues to the date of the episode, though Betty and Bobby went to a farm on what looked like a warm summer day and it was dark in NYC at 7:10 PM. The last two episodes were about two weeks apart, but that farm day couldn’t have been earlier than mid-April.

The episode starts with Don in a theater watching Model Shop (via Hypable). The first line of the summary of the movie on Google sounds somewhat familiar: “George (Gary Lockwood) is a disillusioned 26-year-old who has just quit his stifling job. He lives in Los Angeles with an aspiring young actress named Gloria (Alexandra Hay), who is none too pleased with his recent unemployment.”

Don hears from Megan’s agent that Megan is crumbling and acting (get it?) erratically. He’s got nothing going on so he decides to visit, and it goes… poorly. They fight, and Don tells her the truth about work. “I’ve been good. I haven’t even been drinking that much.” Megan feels betrayed and sends Don home. “This is the way it ends.” Getting kicked out, combined with Model Shop, makes Don rethink his current situation and pursue an opportunity with another firm. (More on this later).

Betty is back and as childish as ever. Her lunch with Francine was so uncomfortable. I don’t remember her being so weird. The conversation between them was stilted, almost as if between two people who didn’t know each other at all. Betty hardly seemed to understand what Francine was saying. The ‘women in the workforce’ theme has been covered a bit (Joan, Peggy, Dawn to name a few), but I’m not sure that’s really what this scene was about. It was more about the world moving on from Betty’s idea of what life is supposed to be like. (“Maybe I’m old fashioned.”) After the lunch, Betty decides she needs something to do, so she agrees to go on a field trip with Bobby. I’d like to imagine it was never OK to smoke on a school bus full of children, but Betty does what she wants around here. I’m not really sure why the teacher’s boobs were part of the show (“Yes, well that blouse says she likes everyone.” and “Farmer’s daughter needs a bra.”), but maybe it will come up at a later date.

Betty is still an emotionally stunted woman child. She tried the milk to look cool in front of a bunch of 10 year olds. It worked, but why would a grown ass woman need that validation? Sure, Bobby might be a dummy for giving away her sandwich, but he didn’t do it to be mean, he didn’t do it because he doesn’t love her. “It was a perfect day and he ruined it.” Betty is cray. There’s literally a child asleep in her arms and she asks Henry why the kids don’t love her. It’s amazing how nice of a kid Bobby is considering his mother and father (“I wish it was yesterday”).

Ken Cosgrove telling Don carousels always makes him think of Don (which is weird, because Ken wasn’t in that meeting.) All of the Don Returns scenes were great, Don and Lou awkward, Don and the creative team, Peggy being cold to Don, Joan being cold to Don, Don not realizing Dawn was doing different things, etc.

Jim Cutler issues Roger Sterling-quality one liners, but with a different, blunt delivery (“Your self-pity is distasteful”). I wonder if he’ll get more screen time. I’m really, really, still not sure how Harry Crane maintains a position of responsibility. He doesn’t show respect to any of his superiors, “This conversation is over, I’m really not interested.” Roger obviously doesn’t think too highly of him, offering to fire him the instant his name came up. Media buys are starting to become more complicated, and Cutler wants to use what they’re paying Don to buy a computer.

Which brings us to Don coming back to SCP. The scene where he got the offer was interesting, “That’s coy” “No that’s drama.” I’m not sure what the woman in the restaurant was all about, but I liked the juxtaposition of us all thinking he was knocking on her door and it being Roger. (Something about where Don gets his gratification from these days?) “You want to come back, come back. I miss you.” I knew it! The scenes with Roger last week were a set up for this. Roger doesn’t jive with Lou, that much is obvious. By having Don come in, Roger forces the issue of Don’s leave of absence, either purposely or not. The other partners think Roger has made a drunken mistake, but he shows he’s considered all the options by explaining it would take 4 years to buy out Don’s partnership share. So they have a meeting all day (the clock behind Don’s head shows 7:10 PM before he’s called into the conference room (I’m not sure why he stayed)), to figure out what to do about it. Joan, Bert, and Jim all want Don gone, but Roger fights for him, and more importantly, the rest of them see the financial implications of firing him. The solution is an agreement to come back stuffed with poison pills (no drinking in the office, reporting to Lou). Don agreeing to these stipulations was an “Oh, wow” moment for me, probably for you, too. I spent the 15 minutes after the episode trying to wrap my head around the legality of the agreement. Could they really create a situation where Don’s partnership shares would be dissolved? I suppose if they offer him an agreement to come back and he refuses, he’s in breach and SCP has the upper hand again anyway. It just seems odd. Also… I don’t think Lou and Don are going to get along.

And then before this wraps up, Don told Megan, “I know how I want you to see me.” Mad Men is still talking about appearances and perceptions of who people are. This will continue to be a major theme until the end of the series. I’m always fascinated by the lines like this. They pop up quite a bit.

Las song was “If 6 Was 9” by Jimi Henrix.

Mad Men Season 7 Episode 3

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