Mad Men Season 6 Episode 13 Recap

Mad Men Art

Every week, Chris Piascik (@chrispiascik) illustrates a moment from the episode and I write up a recap. Lately, I’ve been doing the recaps as a Q&A with David Jacobs right after the episode. First some quick thoughts:

-Thank you so much for reading along this season. Hope you enjoyed!
-This is going to be a hard recap because along with recapping the episode, we have to recap the season, too. Click the links, they’re pretty instructive.
-Here’s a crappy picture off the TV of the new Sterling Cooper & Partners logo. SC&P also have new coffee mugs (to replace the SCDP mugs) and we got to see those, too.
-Stan combs his hair and pitches Don on the idea of starting SC&P’s west coast branch. Don dismisses it before quickly taking the idea from himself. “It’s like Detroit with palm trees.”
-The episode title was “In Care Of,” which literally refers to the telegrams Don and Pete got at different points. Can’t come up with other thematic tie ins.
-It sounds like Chevy likes Bob Benson so much they gave him a car. This made it a little tough for Pete to exert pressure on Bob once they got to Detroit. “How’re you doing?” “NOT SO GREAT, BOB!” I thought it was a little weird Bob pushed back so hard in light of what Pete knows, but… “Ignorance will not be a very good defense.”
-The conversation between Roger and Bob was interesting, too. Joan doesn’t seem to want anything to do with Roger (until she here’s he doesn’t have anywhere to go for Thanksgiving). That said, is the implication that Bob is interested in Joan as a beard? Maybe Bob’s bisexual.
-The pace at the beginning of the show felt super fast, and the fact that AMC still controls where commercials go is ridiculous. It’s better than last year, but not much.
-“Can you keep it down? I’m trying to drink.” it’s the new “THAT’S WHAT THE MONEY IS FOR.”
-“Well I wouldn’t want to do anything immoral..why don’t you tell them what I saw?” Sally’s showing some claws. This impacted Don enough that he got wasted and punched a minister. Something about how the cop said, “You punched a minister, you’re lucky you’re not in Rikers.” reminded me of “You punch a cop, you’re going in.” from Good Will Hunting.
-Mad Men does gallows humor/death scenes really subtly. You don’t expect them, and then someone’s dead. (Same with the near death’s like Kenny getting shot and the British exec getting his foot run over.)
-Pete seemed to take the death of his mother pretty well. His anger at Bob seemed more about the principle of the thing, or that people shouldn’t be able to get away with disrespecting him. Later on in the episode, Megan said “We’re all in the same boat” in reference to the Draper kids. Very heavy. Taking this a step further, being associated with Don is like being on a boat and according to this episode, people on boats die!
-Peggy sassed it up with Chanel No. 5 and a tight dress and it did the trick to get Ted interested. For a night. “Because I don’t want everyone else to have you.” Kind of a jerk, Ted. You shouldn’t have kissed her a few weeks ago.
-The Don Hershey presentation was a great contrast to the Carasoul scene in the first season. A scene I go back to often in these recaps. I think that scene is Mad Men to me, so you can imagine my disappointment every week when we don’t get something like that. It was Don using deeply personal feelings to sell a client on an idea. This time however, he faked it, then came clean. He had the client in the palm of his hand before telling them he didn’t think they should advertise at all. This backs up something David’s been talking about a while, about how Don doesn’t really believe in the products he’s selling anymore, doesn’t believe in anything. It’s why a couple of his pitches didn’t even include the products this year. Kind of the culmination of it. And that leads to him…
-Being fired/suspended. I’d say he doesn’t go back to SC&P, but I’m not sure how that reconciles with the stories of all the other characters.
-Why is Pete going to LA? Trudy said, you’re “Free of her, free of them.” And then he wasn’t at the partners meeting. Is he done, too?
-So, maybe you got the “Going down?” elevator reference as a reference to hell. Did you also catch the tie in to the first episode of the season?
-Don takes his kids to the house he grew up in and Sally gives him a look, like maybe she understands him a bit more? At the beginning of Season 5 there was a quick hint that Megan knew at least something about his past. I wonder if something similar will happen with at least Sally next season.
-I’ve been saying a while that Pete is Don. But maybe Peggy is?

Aaron: So that happened. Quick question. Did you like the episode? Did you like the season?

David: I was just comparing it (in my head) to Game of Thrones. Certainly satisfying at the end, but certainly not worth the investment. Having said that, in for a dime in for a dollar, and I’m excited for season 7. You?

Aaron: I was trying to make myself feel better about devoting so much time to it, but I think that’s as good an answer as any. I don’t want to overstate my unenjoyment or anything. It was fine. It’s better than 99% of media you can consume. Maybe we’re spoiled and things can never be as good as they were in the past. People don’t like watching Arrested Development anymore either.

David: I’ve actually not seen Arrested Development.

Aaron: I’m looking forward to you watching the four seasons of AD all together. You can do it in a weekend.

David: We’ve made the Sopranos comparison a few times this year, and there’s been a lot of attention to this for obvious sad reasons this week, but Sopranos was head and shoulders above the rest. And I’m just now making the connection that in the hour before Mad Men, I was watching James Gandolfini’s Inside the Actor’s Studio appearance and this must have been churning through my head.

Recently I’ve been making the case that binge TV-watching is bad for the soul. I may be wrong! But back to Mad Men. One thing that really struck with me was the moment Don looked down at his shaking hands during the Hershey’s pitch meeting. Especially this season, we’ve really been treated to miserable, unlikable Don. So that emotional payoff, and especially that moment, was quite rewarding for me. Were there any scenes or moments in this episode that stuck with you?

Aaron: I’m not sure if anything will stick with me from this episode. Right now, an hour after watching it… there were a lot of great scenes actually. Don showing his kids where he grew up, obviously. The shaking hands. The guy Duck brought in to replace Don pushing the elevator down (to Hell) for Don. Peggy saying, “Well, aren’t you lucky, to have decisions.” I hope I remember, “Can you keep it down? I’m trying to drink.” because that’s a great line. What will be memorable to you about this season and to that end, do you remember stuff from every season? LIke, what was your take away from season 2?

David: Does Duck lock his dog outside in season 2?

Aaron: I don’t know, maybe, but thanks for reminding me, because is there any way SC&P would retain Duck as their headhunter? And I don’t think there’s anyway they could find a suitable replacement for Don Draper the night before Thanksgiving (assuming the Hershey’s meeting was on the Wednesday before). Especially without the internet! For this season, I think I’ll remember Don falling into the pool, and I should say the merger, but as I’ve mentioned, I don’t think that had as much an impact on the show as we all expected. Maybe what was memorable about it was how it came together in the hotel bar the episode before.

David: I bet they could call Duck on the eve of Thanksgiving and he’d have someone. I didn’t find that incredible. But I take Weiner at his word when he says that each season is a self-contained story. Last year, obviously, Peggy left the firm, and then they wrote her right back into the show. But I also think he’s got a plan for season seven, especially since this is the first time he went into a season with a guarantee lined up for the season after.

Aaron: I guess I never heard Weiner say that about the self-contained story. It’s interesting to think about it in that context, though, because for myself, an I think a lot of people, the show is still about this guy who is not who he says he is. I think the first 4 seasons were about the tension of Don getting found out as Dick. It certainly didn’t come up as a major theme this year, though the idea of being yourself or not being who you say you are came up in dialogue a lot. Is the Don/Dick thing not an important part of the story to you? Did you miss that?

David: I think Don’s identity is still the central tension of the show. The stress of living the lie was grinding him down, and I think that’s why he was so low. And this finale was all about Don finally coming clean, or perhaps as clean as he could, which offers us a little bit of optimism heading into the season 7. And so I guess I like feeling optimistic. Do you know what I mean? Do you feel optimistic?

Aaron: I like optimism, and I like the idea that Season 7 will be about Don tying himself together with his past somehow. I don’t like lending the show the credit to say the identity tension was a big part of the last two seasons. That said, there were OTHER people acting like other people this season, so maybe in retrospect they are foil for Don? The burglar, Bob Benson, and, OH SNAP, Sally Draper made a fake ID to buy beer. Did I miss anyone?

David: Betty missed being Betty Draper, albeit briefly, and perhaps more strongly when Sally was in trouble. Manolo was a minor character, but he certainly had a slippery personality. The firm itself had a bit of an identity crisis, both before & after the merger.

Aaron: Identity crisis is totally different than pretending to be someone you are not, though. I never got the sense Don was having an identity crisis except to the extent he would have been in crisis if someone found out his real identity.

David: I disagree! The show is all about America’s identity crisis in the 60s and 70s, and every character’s own crisis (or comfort) with their identity is just an ingredient in that mix. Don was definitely having an identity crisis during that Hershey’s meeting. His gut has gotten this far, for a decade (or more), but something changed in him in this week’s episode and he just couldn’t do it anymore, even after all but winning the work. I know you hate these kinds of theories. I have to say, the rest of the episode didn’t leave me with many questions. I was satisfied with the Ted/Peggy resolution, and it feels like Pete is beginning to come to terms with the mistakes he’s made. Every episode is better with Trudy. Do you think Bob Benson is having a loving relationship with Joan? I think I do.

Aaron: “Well, aren’t you lucky, to have decisions.” Peggy said that to Ted after he told her he’d decided to stay with his family and move with them to California (to get away from Peggy). The night after they slept together the first time (right?). I need to unpack this a little more, but I thought it was a powerful sentiment. It had more to do with Peggy’s career and personal life and gender(?) than just the relationship with Ted.Again, it felt like a big thematic statement, in an episode that full of them, but I need to think it over more. Do you have any thoughts? Any examples where Peggy hasn’t had the option to make a decision? I think you might be getting sucked into the Pete Campbell Sympathy Trap, a trap I fall into every three episodes. But it did seem like that scene with Trudy was a closure of some sort. Why was he going to LA? I could buy Bob Benson marrying Joan.

David: I have trouble feeling sorry for Peggy. She had the big miss on the Rosemary’s Baby campaign, and it was just sad to see her appealing to Ted that way. But at the end of the day she’s the new Don Draper, spiritually even if Duck’s sidekick gets Don’s title. I don’t know why Pete was going to LA. Maybe the cruise ship was docking there? I’m not sure.

Aaron: I thought it was less about Ted, than her frustration with it all. All of it. “The only unpardonable sin is to believe God cannot forgive you.” Is Don starting to forgive himself or something? Or at least come to peace with who he is.

David: I hadn’t thought of that. But certainly that was a fairly low point! And it gave Megan a chance to assert herself, if ineffectually. I am excited to watch this episode again, and that hasn’t been the case with any other episodes this season, for what it’s worth.

Aaron: “The good is not beating the bad.” but also “Well I wouldn’t want to do anything immoral..why don’t you tell them what I saw?” Sally is turning into a little Don, I guess? Did you see the look she gave him after he showed them the house he grew up in? Was it knowing? Forgiving? Is the bad beating the good? Doesn’t it seem like at the very end, the good might be staging a comeback.

David: Yeah, I missed those comments, but that theme was certainly there. I loved that look. Although the little boy eating the popsicle was a funny signifier of “poverty.”

Aaron: Remember it’s Thanksgiving morning, too.

David: Good point, and the calendar is similar to that of Season 1.

Aaron: You want the last word?

David: You should take the last word – because my take is quite pedestrian. We got a classic Mad Men season – slow start, big twist, thick moods that inspire us to care about otherwise unsympathetic characters. I am excited for season 7, and I feel happy for Dick Whitman. You take the last word!

Aaron: Everyone spent the season, and last season, waiting for someone to die, and it didn’t happen. It’s just not how the show rolls. Sure, Pete’s mom, but she was essentially on the show this season so she could die in this episode. I don’t know. Chris and I are both glad these recaps are over for the year, and thanks to David for helping out the last several weeks.

Mad Men Season 6 Episode 13 Recap

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