Mad Men Season 7 Episode 9 Recap

Mad Men Season 7 Episod 8 art by Chris Piascik

Every week, Chris Piascik (@chrispiascik) illustrates a moment from the episode and I write up a recap.

Episode title: “New Business.”
Episode timing: Megan mentions the 24th of the month, so maybe a couple months later? The only other reference I noticed was Diana seeming to have been away from New York for a while. I didn’t pick up anything hinting at the date.

My favorite part about this episode was when Diana said she had “a twinge in my chest,” and Don said, “a pain.” I was so excited because this a reference to the Carousel scene from the first season. “Teddy told me that in Greek, “nostalgia” literally means “the pain from an old wound.” It’s a twinge in your heart far more powerful than memory alone.” Diana continues to be a reference to all of Don’s women from the past. (To drive this point home, Diana is the goddess of the hunt, worked at a Greek diner, come on.)

I hope we see Diana again. She’s so interesting and sad, real. She tells Don she lost a daughter, and Don thinks she’s punishing herself. When it turns out she’s running away from another daughter, Don realizes… something. She’s a lot like him. Diana living in an empty room contrasts with Don’s now empty house. Diana is living in her pain, wallowing it, and while Don has certainly wallowed, he doesn’t seem to want to remember the pain regularly. Some lines, “Can’t you see I don’t want anything?” “You don’t think I’ve felt grief?” “I know you think you deserve this.” “When I was with you, I forgot about her. I don’t ever want to do that.” Don does want to forget and continues to chase women to be able to… This might be a dumb question, but what’s his main pain? The failure of his family? His childhood? Dick Whitman/Don Draper?

It’s definitely been a while since Don’s double life has been a part of the show, I wonder why. That said, “I know it’s not real, nothing about you is.” Megan wasn’t really talking about Dick Whitman, but maybe she said. “Aging, selfish, sloppy liar.” For the crowd that despises Don, that’s about what they think. “I’m vain.” Yep. Don and Sylvia and Diana and Arnold in the elevator. Yep. (Other people write about the doors/elevators. Check that stuff out sometime.)

Harry Crane is such a dick. When he goes in to tell Don he was going to have lunch with her, he looked disheveled, which had to be on purpose. Harry hits on her and Megan at least has enough self-respect to walk away from him. He’s such a weasel. “Oh, Harry.” With such contempt.

Megan’s mother, Marie, stealing everything from Don’s house was…funny. Marie was mad Megan had to pay for the move, and without changing her tone or skipping a beat, called Megan a whore for letting Don pay for it. And then she clears out the house. And then Megan took a million dollars from Don for the divorce. I don’t know if he had to do that, but she seemed to appreciate it. Now Don can start over fresh with no furniture. Then Roger has sex with Marie in Don’s place, which he knew he shouldn’t have done, but did anyway.

Marie “hates what he’s done to this family.” And she could have been talking about any of the families. This, combined with the reference to the Carousel scene makes me think the loss of Betty/Sally/Bobby/Gene, etc is the big loss. Who knows?

The last story line to discuss in the episode is Peggy and Pima and Stan. I know I shouldn’t still feel like this, but I want more than anything for this story line to lead to a return of Sal Romano. PLEASE. In any case, Pima, a fancy photographer swoops in and seduces Stan and tries to seduce Peggy. Not sure why she was trying to seduce both of them. Wouldn’t she have continued to get work with just Stan on board? Peggy either sees the truth of Pima, or gets Jealous of Stan. Either way, I don’t know what any of this means. “I can feel the tension of your need for my opinion.”

Miscellaneous!

-Betty was on the show for the first time, but I assume we’re not done with her. She’s going to get a masters in psychology because people, “Seek me out to share their confidences.” OK, Betty.

-NAC = “No afternoon calls.” Not bad.

-Don’s secretary references the Manson brothers leading to a funny exchange where Don asks if they’re coming in for meeting.

-Don and Pete have to go golfing with Burt Peterson. Don says he’ll roll up his sleeves and rent clubs. Remember when Burt Peterson got fired from one of the agencies 4 or 5 mergers ago? Pete’s hair is still receding (the actor shaves his hairline back, which is so ballsy) and seemingly asks Don for advice on how to be single.

-The last song: C’Est Si Bon by Yves Montand

Mad Men Season 7 Episode 9 Recap

Mad Men Season 7 Episode 8 Recap

Chris Piascik's illustration for Mad Men Season 7 Episode 8
Every week, Chris Piascik (@chrispiascik) illustrates a moment from the episode and I write up a recap.

Episode title: “Severance.”
Episode timing: Pretty sure the speech Don watches took place between April 20th, and April 30th, 1970 (when the draw-down was announced and when the incursion into Cambodia was announced). Nixon was announcing the removal of 150K soldiers from Vietnam. Episode 7 was on or around July 20th, 1969, so about 9 months from then. More importantly. It seems like the Manson murders may have been skipped.

It usually takes me 3 or 4 episodes to get in a groove with the recaps, so who knows how this will go. Not very well, probably. Over the years, Mad Men has had series finales with a lot of upheaval, only to start next season with everything smoothed out. Though it wasn’t a finale, the mid-season break last year had plenty of upheaval, and though this isn’t a premier, there was plenty of everything smoothed out. Whatever the agency was called last year, they’ve been merged into McCann Erickson. Notably, Don Draper is still there, and Cutler is gone. (Ted Chaough is there, to, with a great mustache. And he and Don seem to be friendly.)

The first scene in the episode, with Don casting a fur advertisement, calls to mind Don’s first copywriting job at a fur shop.

Don and Dottie: A waitress in the diner looks like Rachel Katz of Menken Department stores (Don likes brunettes), and I wonder if this half season is going to be a rehashing of all of Don’s multi-episode flings. Dottie had a book by Jon Dos Passos, but I can’t figure out the significance. Don thinks he knows her, Dottie thinks he’s soliciting her, and, well, Don goes along with it. “You got your $100 worth, you can go.” “You got your $100 worth, you can go” is a pretty obvious reference to the ‘advertising as prostitution’ theme throughout the show.  When Don goes back a third  time, she seems far more gentle, more empathetic. “When people die, everything gets mixed up.” This scene obviously contrasts with Don going to where Rachel Katz’s family was sitting shiva. Rachel’s sister asks Don what he was looking for and he gets that Don Draper puppy dog thing. He still doesn’t know what he’s looking for.

There’s been at least one (two?) airline attendants on the show, so if we are looking back at all of Don’s flings, Tricia from TWA fits right in.

Peggy and Joan: Peggy and Joan have a problem with panty hose (“We had a problem, but we solved it.”) and when they go to a meeting with their colleagues at McCann…it doesn’t solve the problem. Joan is super pissed and Peggy seems less so. Peggy probably (definitely?) has more experience with this, but at the same time, Joan slept with a client to secure his business for the firm. Peggy seems to blame how Joan was dressed, and the years long, unresolved tension between Peggy and Joan is raw. Their relationship is so interesting, because you can never predict how one will respond to the other. Peggy can’t understand why Joan is so pissed because she doesn’t NEED to work like Peggy does. I think Joan can’t really understand why Peggy would take that abuse and not stab anyone. Peggy’s response is to fall in love and Joan’s response is to go shopping. “I want to burn this place down.”

This plot line was contrasted with Peggy’s interaction with her employee Mathis, “You want a raise? Stop acting like a secretary.” And then, “The kind of girl who doesn’t put up with things.” “Funny,” “Fearless.” Peggy continues to be totally in control and totally out of control. “I thought you were a fling, but now I think you might be more.” “I’ve tried new-fashioned.”

Ken Cosgrove: Ken’s story continues to be up and down. His father-in-law is retiring, but a beneficial replacement is stepping in. His wife wants him to quit, and they fight, and the very next day he gets fired by a smirking Ferguson Donnelly and an in-season-form-with-ridiculous-mustache Roger Sterling. (I think Ferg was drinking from a Sterling Cooper Draper Price Mug?) Pretty sure Ken still hates Pete and maybe vice versa? But anyway, Ken goes over all the accounts and writing, “This world is boring.” I think Pete really does envy Ken. Then Ken gets the last laugh by getting a job at Dow to be McCann’s client. “Shit.”

Did you notice in one of the casting scenes Ted Chaough opens the door to let one of the women in, but Pete lets her out? Ted Chaough also has a ridiculous mustache.

Is That All There Is by Peggy Lee was the song at the beginning of the episode AND the end of the episode

Mad Men Season 7 Episode 8 Recap

Mad Men Season 7 episode 7 recap

Mad Men Art
Every week, Chris Piascik (@chrispiascik) illustrates a moment from the episode and I write up a recap.

Episode title: “Waterloo.” Last week when I saw the title of the episode, I thought immediately Bert was going to die. Waterloo is where Napoleon was defeated, and Bert has always struck me as a little Napoleon. Usually I’m wrong about these things.
Episode timing: Apollo 11 took off on July 20, 1969, so that’s pretty clear. Note to Tate conspiracists, The Tate murders are about three weeks from now.

It’s easy to watch a lot of episodes of Mad Men and say nothing happened, even most of the episodes this half season. Well, not tonight. Not tonight!

Bert Cooper getting the opening scene confirmed for me the episode would be about him. I would love to see a Bert Cooper prequel at some point. He seemed to have so much cache (“He was a giant” get it, Napoleon), but in 7 seasons, I think we only saw him do 3 or 4 things. I watched his scene with Roger twice, about being a leader, loyalty, and Jim Cutler not being on his team. Despite him being mad at Don, and tired of him, he still backs him because of team. That was pretty great. “No man has ever come back from leave, even Napoleon.” Roger realizes that with Bert gone, and Don on his way out, he wouldn’t be able to hold off Cutler any longer, and so he engineers the sale of the agency to McCann. Isn’t it going to be weird in the future to watch Mad Men Season 7 and have this giant thing happen between episodes 7 and 8? Also, this feels like the 10th or 15th time a Mad Men season has ended with the agency facing a significant amount of upheaval in the future from some sort of restructuring or sale.

“Maybe they won’t make it, all their problems will be over.” Ted Chaough is done. He’s had it. He’s finished. We didn’t see much of him at all this year, but it seems like Don won the war they were having last season? It’ll be interesting to see if he has a bigger role next year. This is as good a place as any to mention Jim Cutler’s attitude toward the baby Lou Avery. As mentioned previously on the show, Cutler doesn’t care about creative, and Avery is evidence of that. His dismissal of him, “Get back to work” with a little wag of his hand was delicious. I hope we get to see Don fire him next year.

Harry asked Don for impartial advice and he offered, “Don’t negotiate, just accept the deal.” It was sound advice, I wonder what percentage Harry would have gotten. And then he missed out because he hadn’t signed yet. Poor Harry Crane, always looking for more. Maybe he’s the suicide everyone expects? Roger saying Cutler wanted to whittle the agency down to just Harry and the computer makes a lot of his actions previously more clear. “It’s the agency of the future.” Though Cutler didn’t have any interest in the computer until the 2nd or 3rd episode. Was going all in on the computer just an excuse to get rid of Don? When Cutler realizes he’s beat, he capitulates almost instantly. “It’s a lot of money.” It finally became clear why Joan was so venomously mad at Don (though, I guess I should have remembered this), when Don merged with Ted to cancel the IPO, he cost Joan about a million dollars. Don pitching Ted on staying was nice because we got to see Don pitch one final time. He mentioned again (though it hasn’t come up in a while) not wanting to deal with the the business side anymore, he just wanted to do the work, to be creative. “You don’t want to see what happens when it’s really gone.”

Cutler perceived Don’s surprise arrival at the cigarette meeting as a breach of contract, and moved quickly to have him terminated. He erred by not including all the other partners in his plans, especially because Don had been the good soldier lately. “Sometimes actions have consequences.” Earlier in the season or last season, Cutler said something about “what Don did to Ted” or something. It seems like he’s really had it out for Don since then. Pete is protective of his prize pitcher, “That is a very sensitive piece of horse flesh, he shouldn’t be rattled.”

Don being threatened with termination has his secretary throwing herself at him. That was… unexpected. It also leads Don to call Megan and discuss it as an opportunity. She doesn’t see it that way. It’s been happening all season, and some last, but they’ve grown apart. They seemed to have patched things up after their last fight, but only on the surface. Megan doesn’t want what Don can offer, he knows it, and he doesn’t even fight it. I think his offering to take care of her was also mostly, “Don’t tell anyone about my secret,” but at this point, who could she tell? None of her new friends would care. “Aren’t you tired of fighting?” “I guess I could see it as an opportunity.” “Marriage is a racket.”

The scenes of everyone watching the moon landing were excellent and foreshadowed Peggy’s pitch. Peggy, Pete, Harry, and Don; Roger, Mona, their grandson, and son-in-law; Betty and co; Bert and his maid. “One small step for man, one giant step for mankind.” Peggy’s pitch was like a less polished Don pitch. Same tempo, storytelling, etc. “All of us were doing the same thing at the same time.”

Peggy didn’t end up wearing either of the outfits she asked Julio about. Julio, who basically functions as a reminder to Peggy’s pregnancy. (As did “Pete’s pregnant,” which I’m not really sure I know what that means.) And during the pitch, when Peggy mentioned there was a 10 year old boy at her house watching television, the next shot was of Pete. There baby would only be about eight and a half, though. Don has been pretty supportive of Peggy for a while, or at least an episode and a half, but it was back to their early to mid-series form like when she was driving out to NJ to bail him out. “What if there was another table where everyone gets what they want when they want.” That’s been brought up before, mostly relation to Don doing whatever he wanted when he wanted, and not having any consequences. Peggy getting drop ceiling installed in her house was funny.

Cynical Sally is making eyes at the hunky older stud whose family is visiting. She does her hair and wears make up on her way to work, for his part, the hunky stud doesn’t wear a shirt when going down for breakfast. One might assume Betty would be furious at this behavior, but she’s not, I think, because she approves of it. Kind of a tie in to the conversation around Sally almost breaking her nose and her face being all she had. Also, from what we know about Betty, it wouldn’t have been a surprise for her to hit on the kid. I picked up on a contrasting of Sally and the football player with Peggy and the handyman, but as always, I’m too tired to figure it out, and let’s be honest, I probably couldn’t figure it out anyway. In any case, while I think Betty approved of Sally’s actions, I think Sally kissing Neil, instead of the hunky older stud, was another pushback against her mother. It was her not being cynical. The hunky older stud said something about how much the moon landing cost, a line of thinking Sally parrots to Don a few minutes later. Don responds, “Don’t be so cynical” and she takes it to heart. It’s nice. Also, she smokes cigarettes exactly like Betty and it’s spooky.

And that leaves us with a bestockinged Bert Cooper singing and dancing for Don, “The Best Things in Life Are Free.” Don appeared to be headed to his old office before the song and dance, and it makes him teary. So what are the free things Don is going to take joy in next year? The work! I don’t want to think too much about this song and dance, except, again, it’s going to be weird in the future when people are binge watching Season 7. I’m pretty glad not to have to stay up until 1:30 on Sunday nights anymore for a while, but splitting the season was done for purely money reasons on the part of AMC and it’s bullshit.

So what do we expect for next year? It won’t take 7 episodes to wrap things up tightly, so I imagine there will be more drama and intrigue. If Megan actually is going to be killed in the Manson Family murders, then next year will have to pick up 3 weeks from now. That would actually track roughly with a month passing between episodes, but I’m not sure how that’s more than a one episode story at most. What do you think’s going to happen?

Mad Men Season 7 episode 7 recap

Mad Men Season 7 Episode 6 recap

Mad Men Art
Every week, Chris Piascik (@chrispiascik) illustrates a moment from the episode and I write up a recap.

Episode title: “The Strategy.” Ostensibly, this calls to mind the strategy for Burger Chef, but I think it also refers to Bob Benson and Joan, McCann/Roger, Cutler and Phillip Morris, and ultimately Don.

I don’t know when the episode takes place, but maybe early to mid-summer based on Bonnie coveting the air conditioning and Don saying he’d be back in California at the end of July and it not seeming too far away. Let’s say mid to late June? (That said, Oh! Calcutta! the theater revue Bonnie and Pete were going to go to didn’t debut until June 17, so maybe it’s later in June?

One of the major themes of the episode was sexism, how women are treated, etc. The first scene, when Peggy was doing market research, she couldn’t get anything from the woman because the woman needed to beat her husband home. Picking up fast food was an issue because the woman was already supposed to cook.
“Bad enough I’m not making dinner.” Don was going to take Megan shopping and Pete told Bonnie he wanted her “shopping all day and screwing all night.” I don’t know why the writers would have both of them say it.
“Who gives mom’s permission? Dads.” The entire pitch of Burger Chef originally was couched in the idea that it needed to be OK for moms/families to eat there instead of a home cooked meal. Then, once they have a pitch everyone’s happy with (for the time being), Pete wants Don to do the pitch. “Don will give authority, you’ll give emotion.” While Peggy is, “Every bit as good as any woman in this business,” she’s not good enough to close the deal? On the pitch, Lou is happy to perpetuate the status quo, like a fucking chump. “It’s nice to see family happiness again.” Peggy is good enough at her job to know that while the pitch is acceptable, it’s not the best they can do.

Another storyline on the theme of a woman’s role is Bob Benson proposing to Joan. They have a great relationship, and it hasn’t been entirely clear (especially because he hasn’t been on this season) he was grooming her to be his beard. Joan reveals she knew all along Bob was into men. “Bob, put that away.” He was shocked she didn’t accept the proposal based on the fact he was offering her more than anyone else (his words). In his mind, a woman needed a husband. “I want love, and I’d rather die hoping that happens than make some arrangement.” Joan tenderly suggests Bob deserves that, too. “America needs engineers.” The smarmy Chevy VP who laid it on thick with Joan turns out to be gay and calls Bob Benson to bail him out when he gets arrested for it. I don’t know how he knew Bob Benson was gay, and I don’t know why I can’t just call him Bob or Benson, but Bob Benson. In exchange for bailing him out, the exec tells Bob SCP is going to lose Chevy, and Bob Benson will be hired at Buick.

Bonnie and Pete join the Mile High Club, “I’ve always wanted to do that.” I can’t quite understand what Bonnie saw in Pete, and Pete is clearly still tied up in Trudy. Rather, Pete doesn’t like something not going his way, and Trudy not sticking with him, despite his terrible husbandness, is Pete not getting his way. “I don’t like you in New York.” It’s true, California Pete is happy. This episode follows a series long habit of lulling the audience into sympathy for Pete for a few episodes before making him out to be a royal asshole in one episode. Getting Don to pitch instead of Peggy, being a jerk to Trudy, and then a jerk to Bonnie was asshole Pete in all his glory. Bonnie seemed interested things with Pete being more serious, but that’s not where his head was at.

“You really got to keep an eye on him.” Ken Cosgrove doesn’t disappoint.
and
Let it not be said Lou Avery’s Tiki bar went unmentioned in this recap.
and
Bonnie and Megan flying home on the same flight.
and
“Say what you will, but he’s very loyal.” So I guess Harry Crane finally got what he wanted. I should have more to say about this.
and
I suppose Bonnie reminds me of what Betty would be like if she was less of a child and more responsible.
and
Roger in the steam room with a rival exec. I was unclear if he was trying to hire Roger or Don or buy SCP. Roger seems to figure out what he wanted at the end of the episode, so that’s good. I love it when a plan comes together. Cutler’s ploy to bring in a cigarette company to force out Don is fairly savvy, but Don has a strategy? “Stop thinking about Don and start thinking about the company.”

Which leaves us with Don. Megan visits and, I must have missed an episode somewhere, I’ve never, ever understood why Peggy likes her so much. She always has and it seems very out of character to me. “I didn’t know he was married.” Oh, Marcia, are you trying to get him in trouble? Speaking of trouble, Bonnie went right to Don’s office. What was that about? Not sure I can describe this well, but remember when Pete called Bonnie to tell her to go to the show without him, and then the next scene was the phone ringing at Don’s? Didn’t you think that was going to be Bonnie on the phone? In any case, Don wakes up and wistfully sees Megan out on the balcony. (There’s that balcony again! Watch, the series is going to end and nothing will have happened on that balcony.) At another point, he’s watching her pack up her things, making her move to the West Coast more official, more permanent. Don was also looking at the newspaper from the day after JFK was killed. It was uncovered during Megan’s packing, but I’m not quite sure what the allusion was. Maybe everything’s falling apart.

At the beginning of the episode, Don’s being the good team member, supporting Peggy even when Pete puts him on the spot. Peggy’s still mad at him, and eventually I’ll re-watch last season to remember why. It’s obvious why Lou doesn’t want him in that meeting. There’s a reckoning coming, Lou, just be aware. When Don finds out he’s supposed to do the pitch, he celebrates like a kid, pumping his fist. He’s doing the work like Freddy told him to, and it’s starting to pay off. He also puts a bug in Peggy’s ear that there may be another way to do the pitch, which ruins her weekend. (Peggy tells him to mention the tag at the end of the pitch like he just thought of it. “Do I do that?” I realized just now that line reminded me of the character Jon Hamm played on 30 Rock who is oblivious to how good looking he is.) On Saturday morning, she smokes a cigarette and calls Stan from Stan’s office. Later on, she’s drinking in Lou’s office where Don finds her. “It’s poisoned because you expressed yourself!” Peggy said she never would have done that, but Don explains the not knowing, being OK with not knowing, is how to get where he got. She asks him to, “Tell me what your saves the day plan is.” She’s finally willing to forgive him and they have a pretty serious conversation. In discussing the strategy, it turns out the family they were trying to portray, the one who eats dinner together etc, doesn’t exist. “Does this family exist anymore?” Don can’t remember if his family with Betty was ever like that. “The hell do I know about being a mom?” Is there ever going to be any more acknowledgement Peggy gave her baby up, or did she block it out completely?

Somewhat unsolicited, Don tells Peggy, “I worry about a lot of things, but I don’t worry about you,” which leads to Don frankly telling Peggy his fears, “That I never did anything and I don’t have anyone.” He says it so matter of factily, it’s clear Don and Peggy are close again, and if that didn’t seal it, dancing to I Did it My Way seals the deal. This feels like Don giving up on Megan. This feels like Don hitting bottom (even though not really). Peggy and Don hit on a new strategy, making it OK to go to Burger Chef, focusing more on the restaurant than on the family. Don did the work, and now he’s repaired his relationship with Peggy. The end is nigh, Lou avery.

The last scene was interesting in that it was a visualization of Peggy’s strategy. No matter who is at the table, from outside it looks like family. Don, Pete, Peggy living the commercial. My wife commented Burger Chefs looked very 1950s (“1955 was a good year.” ahem), out of place at the end of the 60s. Pulling on that a little bit, the original strategy was out of place for the middle of 1969. It’s an interesting juxtaposition between the two decades and advertising strategies.

Mad Men Season 7 Episode 6 recap

Sharknado Longreads

Like most of Twitter, I watched Sharknado on Thursday night. I write about sharks pretty often, so I wasn’t going to miss it. The compelling, sciency thriller from SyFy was remarkable in its badness, but the people needed it. The people needed to experience something together and SyFy delivered. The movie was terrible, predictable, and suffered from poor acting, directing, and effects. Other than that, it was great. I think the most surprising thing about last night was I didn’t lose any Twitter followers. In any case, here are about 40 some odd Sharknado links.

io9’s preview predicted Sharknado’s brilliance. Well done!

SyFy is already talking about how to ruin the Sharknado magic by releasing a sequel. I’d probably watch. And I hope I remember to watch Blast Vegas.

And yes, a “Sharknado” sequel is already being discussed at the Syfy headquarters, though official plans have yet to coalesce. For now, the cabler is planning a rerun of the pic next Thursday at 7 p.m. to serve as a lead-in to Frankie Muniz-starrer “Blast Vegas.”

The Verge

If you were on Twitter at virtually any time Thursday evening, it was almost impossible to avoid mention of Sharknado. Celebrities like Damon Lindelof and Patton Oswalt spent much of the night tweeting sarcastic one-liners, headlining an online viewing party that included everyone from Newark’s mayor, Cory Booker, to Mia Farrow. At its peak, the film was generating more than 5,000 tweets per minute — nowhere near record levels, but undoubtedly impressive for a low-budget cable movie about airborne killer sharks.

An interactive chart of the number of Tweets about Sharknado during the 9PM showing.

An interview with Sharknado director Anthony Ferrante.

CBS talked to Ian.

io9 interviewed Sharknado screenwriter Thunder Levin.

Why a tornado and not a hurricane? Wouldn’t that make more sense?

Actually, we have both. In the movie an unprecedented hurricane sweeps up the Pacific coast from Mexico towards L.A. driving all the sharks in this part of the ocean before it. The hurricane floods the streets of L.A., which is woefully unprepared for a hurricane. (Up to this point, it’s all fairly accurate and something we should be thinking about, disaster preparedness-wise). Naturally these floodwaters are filled with sharks! And then, as often happens, the hurricane spins off tornadoes over the ocean. As anyone would expect, the tornadoes suck up thousands of sharks. This all just seems like common sense to me…

Last year, Grandland wrote a profile of The Asylum, the studio responsible for Sharknado, and most of all the B movie knock offs these days.

Buy Sharknado on Blu-Ray.

Round up of celebrity Tweets. And one from Us Weekly. And E Online.

The LA Times.

And as television struts and preens with its new-found status as the hottest screen in town, it’s important to be reminded of its humble roots: play-acting in the backyard. It isn’t just the lowly production values (rubber sharks, Etch-a-Sketch storm clouds) or how the actors react to airborne sharks with the matter-of-fact casualness of porn stars stumbling upon a laundry room orgy (Oh, hey, watch your foot). It’s the whole over-the-top insanity of it all, the splendid and glorious belief that if you say even god-awful lines firmly enough, if you look hot while drawing some weapon with which you clearly have no familiarity, if you acknowledge the yawning chasms in plot by saying things like “This is crazy” and “Do you trust me?” often enough, your audience will stay with you.

EW on why we love Sharknado.

It’s scientific. ”Bombs. Instead of letting live sharks rain down on people, we’re going to get into that chopper, throw bombs into the tornado, and blow those bastards to bits!” Matt uses his flight school training to calculate a flawless solution to the shark-littered twisters wreaking havoc across L.A. Baz teaches his disciples that a tornado is just two winds blowing at different speeds that combine and rotate together. Fin, Matt, and Baz combine their masterful knowledge of nature and physics only to inform us that you can actually just throw a homemade bomb into the center of the cyclone to neutralize it, and the sun comes out immediately after detonation.

ESPN’s Twitter account tried to have a little fun with the San Jose Sharks. Oops.

Mother Jones poses a serious question.

The film raises a serious question: Could a sharknado happen in real life? Animals often get caught in the paths of tornadoes, but they typically die before they get the chance to harm Tara Reid. An Associated Press report from 1969 describes a Florida tornado that swept through Ocean World. Rather than emboldening the sharks and inspiring heightened, Tara Reid-related bloodlust, the tornado sent the startled animals diving for cover at the bottom of their shallow pool. “We haven’t counted the sharks yet,” the Ocean World president told the press as his team frantically checked up on the park’s valuable fish. In the end, his team had no sharknado to report. Furthermore, even if a sharknado were to somehow form and begin chasing Tara Reid, it is improbable that the whirlwind of shark would pose a danger to humans beyond accidental crushing. (Sharks rarely ever hurt people, and you’re more likely to get maimed by your own toilet than by any species of shark.)

How Sharknado explains the federal reserve.

Sharknado’s amazing political power.

James Poniewozik checked in from vacation to review Sharknado for Time.

Really, it’s a deceptively tough feat that the makers of Sharknado pulled off: making a movie that’s shlockily and campily hilarious without seeming to try too hard to make something shlockily and campily hilarious. (While I don’t want to make too many assumptions about the cast and crew’s intent, this delightful io9 interview with screenwriter Thunder Levin suggests they went in with tongue in man-eating cheek.) Oh sure, you’d think it’s as easy as casting Ian Ziering and Tara Reid, hiring a hobo to do the CGI, and letting the magic make itself. But it’s easy to see where a title like this could become self-serious or smirky.

Science!

But as a scientist, science communications professor, and strategist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, I’ve become much more open-minded about strategies to bring science to the public. You really can’t let these cultural phenomena pass you by, no matter how silly they might seem at the outset.

Regardless of however much merit their complaints might have, Flavorwire seems to be the only ones down on Sharknado.

Five movie ideas that studios can steal from ‘Sharknado’. Also, the five worst lines from Sharknado. Also, five things SyFy taught us last night. And also, six things Sharknado got right about LA and six things got wrong.

Inside the SyFy movie factory.

Today, Syfy averages 24 movies a year, each with around a $1.5 million budget, or about 1/130th of what it cost to make Michael Bay’s last Transformers movie. Syfy’s monsters are poorly rendered CGI characters that always look technologically out-of-date by at least a decade. But who cares? If you’re watching Sharknado, cinematic realism is probably not your top priority.

CNN, Mashable, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, The Atlantic, USA Today, Telegraph UK, Politico, Vulture, MTV, Salon, Grantland, The Daily Beast.

The Sharknado trailer.

Sharknado Longreads

Mad Men Season 6 Episode 13 Recap

Mad Men Art

Every week, Chris Piascik (@chrispiascik) illustrates a moment from the episode and I write up a recap. Lately, I’ve been doing the recaps as a Q&A with David Jacobs right after the episode. First some quick thoughts:

-Thank you so much for reading along this season. Hope you enjoyed!
-This is going to be a hard recap because along with recapping the episode, we have to recap the season, too. Click the links, they’re pretty instructive.
-Here’s a crappy picture off the TV of the new Sterling Cooper & Partners logo. SC&P also have new coffee mugs (to replace the SCDP mugs) and we got to see those, too.
-Stan combs his hair and pitches Don on the idea of starting SC&P’s west coast branch. Don dismisses it before quickly taking the idea from himself. “It’s like Detroit with palm trees.”
-The episode title was “In Care Of,” which literally refers to the telegrams Don and Pete got at different points. Can’t come up with other thematic tie ins.
-It sounds like Chevy likes Bob Benson so much they gave him a car. This made it a little tough for Pete to exert pressure on Bob once they got to Detroit. “How’re you doing?” “NOT SO GREAT, BOB!” I thought it was a little weird Bob pushed back so hard in light of what Pete knows, but… “Ignorance will not be a very good defense.”
-The conversation between Roger and Bob was interesting, too. Joan doesn’t seem to want anything to do with Roger (until she here’s he doesn’t have anywhere to go for Thanksgiving). That said, is the implication that Bob is interested in Joan as a beard? Maybe Bob’s bisexual.
-The pace at the beginning of the show felt super fast, and the fact that AMC still controls where commercials go is ridiculous. It’s better than last year, but not much.
-“Can you keep it down? I’m trying to drink.” it’s the new “THAT’S WHAT THE MONEY IS FOR.”
-“Well I wouldn’t want to do anything immoral..why don’t you tell them what I saw?” Sally’s showing some claws. This impacted Don enough that he got wasted and punched a minister. Something about how the cop said, “You punched a minister, you’re lucky you’re not in Rikers.” reminded me of “You punch a cop, you’re going in.” from Good Will Hunting.
-Mad Men does gallows humor/death scenes really subtly. You don’t expect them, and then someone’s dead. (Same with the near death’s like Kenny getting shot and the British exec getting his foot run over.)
-Pete seemed to take the death of his mother pretty well. His anger at Bob seemed more about the principle of the thing, or that people shouldn’t be able to get away with disrespecting him. Later on in the episode, Megan said “We’re all in the same boat” in reference to the Draper kids. Very heavy. Taking this a step further, being associated with Don is like being on a boat and according to this episode, people on boats die!
-Peggy sassed it up with Chanel No. 5 and a tight dress and it did the trick to get Ted interested. For a night. “Because I don’t want everyone else to have you.” Kind of a jerk, Ted. You shouldn’t have kissed her a few weeks ago.
-The Don Hershey presentation was a great contrast to the Carasoul scene in the first season. A scene I go back to often in these recaps. I think that scene is Mad Men to me, so you can imagine my disappointment every week when we don’t get something like that. It was Don using deeply personal feelings to sell a client on an idea. This time however, he faked it, then came clean. He had the client in the palm of his hand before telling them he didn’t think they should advertise at all. This backs up something David’s been talking about a while, about how Don doesn’t really believe in the products he’s selling anymore, doesn’t believe in anything. It’s why a couple of his pitches didn’t even include the products this year. Kind of the culmination of it. And that leads to him…
-Being fired/suspended. I’d say he doesn’t go back to SC&P, but I’m not sure how that reconciles with the stories of all the other characters.
-Why is Pete going to LA? Trudy said, you’re “Free of her, free of them.” And then he wasn’t at the partners meeting. Is he done, too?
-So, maybe you got the “Going down?” elevator reference as a reference to hell. Did you also catch the tie in to the first episode of the season?
-Don takes his kids to the house he grew up in and Sally gives him a look, like maybe she understands him a bit more? At the beginning of Season 5 there was a quick hint that Megan knew at least something about his past. I wonder if something similar will happen with at least Sally next season.
-I’ve been saying a while that Pete is Don. But maybe Peggy is?

Aaron: So that happened. Quick question. Did you like the episode? Did you like the season?

David: I was just comparing it (in my head) to Game of Thrones. Certainly satisfying at the end, but certainly not worth the investment. Having said that, in for a dime in for a dollar, and I’m excited for season 7. You?

Aaron: I was trying to make myself feel better about devoting so much time to it, but I think that’s as good an answer as any. I don’t want to overstate my unenjoyment or anything. It was fine. It’s better than 99% of media you can consume. Maybe we’re spoiled and things can never be as good as they were in the past. People don’t like watching Arrested Development anymore either.

David: I’ve actually not seen Arrested Development.

Aaron: I’m looking forward to you watching the four seasons of AD all together. You can do it in a weekend.

David: We’ve made the Sopranos comparison a few times this year, and there’s been a lot of attention to this for obvious sad reasons this week, but Sopranos was head and shoulders above the rest. And I’m just now making the connection that in the hour before Mad Men, I was watching James Gandolfini’s Inside the Actor’s Studio appearance and this must have been churning through my head.

Recently I’ve been making the case that binge TV-watching is bad for the soul. I may be wrong! But back to Mad Men. One thing that really struck with me was the moment Don looked down at his shaking hands during the Hershey’s pitch meeting. Especially this season, we’ve really been treated to miserable, unlikable Don. So that emotional payoff, and especially that moment, was quite rewarding for me. Were there any scenes or moments in this episode that stuck with you?

Aaron: I’m not sure if anything will stick with me from this episode. Right now, an hour after watching it… there were a lot of great scenes actually. Don showing his kids where he grew up, obviously. The shaking hands. The guy Duck brought in to replace Don pushing the elevator down (to Hell) for Don. Peggy saying, “Well, aren’t you lucky, to have decisions.” I hope I remember, “Can you keep it down? I’m trying to drink.” because that’s a great line. What will be memorable to you about this season and to that end, do you remember stuff from every season? LIke, what was your take away from season 2?

David: Does Duck lock his dog outside in season 2?

Aaron: I don’t know, maybe, but thanks for reminding me, because is there any way SC&P would retain Duck as their headhunter? And I don’t think there’s anyway they could find a suitable replacement for Don Draper the night before Thanksgiving (assuming the Hershey’s meeting was on the Wednesday before). Especially without the internet! For this season, I think I’ll remember Don falling into the pool, and I should say the merger, but as I’ve mentioned, I don’t think that had as much an impact on the show as we all expected. Maybe what was memorable about it was how it came together in the hotel bar the episode before.

David: I bet they could call Duck on the eve of Thanksgiving and he’d have someone. I didn’t find that incredible. But I take Weiner at his word when he says that each season is a self-contained story. Last year, obviously, Peggy left the firm, and then they wrote her right back into the show. But I also think he’s got a plan for season seven, especially since this is the first time he went into a season with a guarantee lined up for the season after.

Aaron: I guess I never heard Weiner say that about the self-contained story. It’s interesting to think about it in that context, though, because for myself, an I think a lot of people, the show is still about this guy who is not who he says he is. I think the first 4 seasons were about the tension of Don getting found out as Dick. It certainly didn’t come up as a major theme this year, though the idea of being yourself or not being who you say you are came up in dialogue a lot. Is the Don/Dick thing not an important part of the story to you? Did you miss that?

David: I think Don’s identity is still the central tension of the show. The stress of living the lie was grinding him down, and I think that’s why he was so low. And this finale was all about Don finally coming clean, or perhaps as clean as he could, which offers us a little bit of optimism heading into the season 7. And so I guess I like feeling optimistic. Do you know what I mean? Do you feel optimistic?

Aaron: I like optimism, and I like the idea that Season 7 will be about Don tying himself together with his past somehow. I don’t like lending the show the credit to say the identity tension was a big part of the last two seasons. That said, there were OTHER people acting like other people this season, so maybe in retrospect they are foil for Don? The burglar, Bob Benson, and, OH SNAP, Sally Draper made a fake ID to buy beer. Did I miss anyone?

David: Betty missed being Betty Draper, albeit briefly, and perhaps more strongly when Sally was in trouble. Manolo was a minor character, but he certainly had a slippery personality. The firm itself had a bit of an identity crisis, both before & after the merger.

Aaron: Identity crisis is totally different than pretending to be someone you are not, though. I never got the sense Don was having an identity crisis except to the extent he would have been in crisis if someone found out his real identity.

David: I disagree! The show is all about America’s identity crisis in the 60s and 70s, and every character’s own crisis (or comfort) with their identity is just an ingredient in that mix. Don was definitely having an identity crisis during that Hershey’s meeting. His gut has gotten this far, for a decade (or more), but something changed in him in this week’s episode and he just couldn’t do it anymore, even after all but winning the work. I know you hate these kinds of theories. I have to say, the rest of the episode didn’t leave me with many questions. I was satisfied with the Ted/Peggy resolution, and it feels like Pete is beginning to come to terms with the mistakes he’s made. Every episode is better with Trudy. Do you think Bob Benson is having a loving relationship with Joan? I think I do.

Aaron: “Well, aren’t you lucky, to have decisions.” Peggy said that to Ted after he told her he’d decided to stay with his family and move with them to California (to get away from Peggy). The night after they slept together the first time (right?). I need to unpack this a little more, but I thought it was a powerful sentiment. It had more to do with Peggy’s career and personal life and gender(?) than just the relationship with Ted.Again, it felt like a big thematic statement, in an episode that full of them, but I need to think it over more. Do you have any thoughts? Any examples where Peggy hasn’t had the option to make a decision? I think you might be getting sucked into the Pete Campbell Sympathy Trap, a trap I fall into every three episodes. But it did seem like that scene with Trudy was a closure of some sort. Why was he going to LA? I could buy Bob Benson marrying Joan.

David: I have trouble feeling sorry for Peggy. She had the big miss on the Rosemary’s Baby campaign, and it was just sad to see her appealing to Ted that way. But at the end of the day she’s the new Don Draper, spiritually even if Duck’s sidekick gets Don’s title. I don’t know why Pete was going to LA. Maybe the cruise ship was docking there? I’m not sure.

Aaron: I thought it was less about Ted, than her frustration with it all. All of it. “The only unpardonable sin is to believe God cannot forgive you.” Is Don starting to forgive himself or something? Or at least come to peace with who he is.

David: I hadn’t thought of that. But certainly that was a fairly low point! And it gave Megan a chance to assert herself, if ineffectually. I am excited to watch this episode again, and that hasn’t been the case with any other episodes this season, for what it’s worth.

Aaron: “The good is not beating the bad.” but also “Well I wouldn’t want to do anything immoral..why don’t you tell them what I saw?” Sally is turning into a little Don, I guess? Did you see the look she gave him after he showed them the house he grew up in? Was it knowing? Forgiving? Is the bad beating the good? Doesn’t it seem like at the very end, the good might be staging a comeback.

David: Yeah, I missed those comments, but that theme was certainly there. I loved that look. Although the little boy eating the popsicle was a funny signifier of “poverty.”

Aaron: Remember it’s Thanksgiving morning, too.

David: Good point, and the calendar is similar to that of Season 1.

Aaron: You want the last word?

David: You should take the last word – because my take is quite pedestrian. We got a classic Mad Men season – slow start, big twist, thick moods that inspire us to care about otherwise unsympathetic characters. I am excited for season 7, and I feel happy for Dick Whitman. You take the last word!

Aaron: Everyone spent the season, and last season, waiting for someone to die, and it didn’t happen. It’s just not how the show rolls. Sure, Pete’s mom, but she was essentially on the show this season so she could die in this episode. I don’t know. Chris and I are both glad these recaps are over for the year, and thanks to David for helping out the last several weeks.

Mad Men Season 6 Episode 13 Recap