What does it mean to be ‘fully human’ online?

In general, moralizing sucks. It gets especially annoying when cultural commentators talk about how much society has changed, for the worse, with the advent of technology and the internet. Ezra Klein:

So if you’re someone who likes to spend Saturday in a quiet room with a good book and a long time to think about it, you might find Facebook unnerving. And Zadie Smith and Ross Douthat do. Sometimes, I’d guess, we all do. Conversely, if you’re someone who likes people but has trouble meeting them, or gets shy in unfamiliar social settings, you probably don’t think the Internet has made you less human.

What does it mean to be ‘fully human’ online?

Facebook is Google

In an article about Google’s recent surprise company-wide raise and bonus this about Facebook’s staff.

Of the more than 1,900 Facebook employees with resumes on LinkedIn, 300 — around 15% of Facebook’s staff — list Google as a past employer.

Is that a lot? Because it sounds like a lot to me. Also, the person that leaked the raise/bonus info to Business Insider got fired. They presumably will not be receiving a raise or a bonus. Unless they go work for Facebook.

Facebook is Google

Don’t contemporary book characters have iPhones?

In my best Andy Rooney voice, did you ever notice how characters in books and movies don’t use smartphones/computers/theinternets the way that people (we) normally do? This goes beyond the idea of sitcom killing cell phones, though. Think about the last contemporary book you read. Do smartphones exist in that book? Are they used in any meaningful way by the main characters?

From Where Are the iPhone Addicts and Facebook ‘Stalkers’ in Contemporary Fiction? by Joanne McNeil.

The average fictional character is either so thoroughly disinterested in email, social media, and text messages he never thinks of it, or else hastily mentions electronic communications in the past tense. Sure, characters in fiction may own smart phones, but few have the urge to compulsively play with the device while waiting to meet a friend or catch a flight. This ever-present anachronism has made it so that almost all literary fiction is science fiction, a thought experiment as to what life might be like if we weren’t so absorbed in our iPhones but instead watched and listened to the world around us at a moment’s rest.

Via The Daily Dish

Don’t contemporary book characters have iPhones?

I Write Like Analysis

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There’s this nifty tool floating around the internet the last couple days called I Write Like. You put a couple paragraphs into a box, click submit, and get the name of a famous author that you write like. I was wondering how good it was, so I spent a couple hours putting in some paragraphs of famous authors to see what I Write Like would come up with.

The results were mixed. A lot of these writers write like David Foster Wallace even if David Foster Wallace writes like Ian Fleming. I found the Project Gutenberg website with the top 100 ebooks and I Write Like did pretty well with the first couple paragraphs with most of those authors. In any case, I Write Like nailed 14 of the 30 classic authors giving it a success rate of 47%. For what it’s worth, Jersey Shore Nickname Generator is accurate 94% of the time. Note: The tool is fun. This isn’t a fair test.

James Joyce – The Dubliners is like James Joyce.
Stephen King – The Gingerbread Girl is like Dan Brown or William Gibson depending how many paragraphs you take.
William Gibson – Neuromancer is like David Foster Wallace.
David Foster Wallace – Consider the Lobster is like Ian Fleming.
Mark Twain – Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is like Mark Twain.
Ambrose Bierce – An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge is like Robert Louis Stephenson. This is my favorite short story, by the way.
William Faulkner – A Rose for Emily is like Margaret Mitchell.
Ernest Hemingway – Hills Like White Elephants is like Ian Fleming. I was pretty sure this one would be right.
F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Diamond as Big as the Ritz is like H.P. Lovecraft.
H. P. Lovecraft – At the Mountains of Madness is like Edgar Allan Poe.
Edgar Allan Poe – The Angel of the Odd is like David Foster Wallace.
J.D. Salinger РFor Esm̩ Рwith Love and Squalor is like Arthur Conan Doyle.
Arthur Conan Doyle – The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is like Arthur Conan Doyle.
Franz Kafka – Metamorphosis is like James Joyce.
Treasure Island – Robert Louis Stevenson is like Robert Louis Stevenson.
William Shakespeare – Hamlet is like William Shakespeare.
Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice is like Jane Austen.
Lewis Carroll – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is like Lewis Carroll.
Alexandre Dumas – The Count of Monte Cristo is like Charles Dickens.
Charles Dickens – A Tale of Two Cities is like Charles Dickens.
Bram Stoker – Dracula is like Bram Stoker.
H. G. Wells – The War of the Worlds, by is like H.G. Wells.
Emily Bronte – Wuthering Heights is like Daniel Defoe.
Agata Christie – The Secret Adversary is like Agatha Christie.
Beatrix Potter – Peter Rabbit is like Arthur Conan Doyle.
Herman Melville – Moby Dick; Or the Whale is like Robert Louis Stevenson.
Mary Shelley – Frankenstein is like Mary Shelley.
Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy is like Leo Tolstoy.
Homer – The Iliad is like William Shakespeare.
Kurt Vonnegut – Cat’s Cradle is like Kurt Vonnegut.

Then, in the interest of pandering, I thought I’d look up a few contemporary writers/websites I like:
Jason Kottke is like (this surprises no one) David Foster Wallace.
The Daily What is like Stephen King.
John Gruber / Daring Fireball is like Stephen King.
Andy Baio / Waxy.org is like James Joyce.
Michael Lewis is like David Foster Wallace.
Chuck Klosterman is like Kurt Vonegut.
Bill Simmons is like Stephen King.

Now some pop culture folks:
Tracy Jordan is like James Joyce.
Don Draper‘s slide projector monologue is like Margaret Atwood.
The Real Shaq on Twitter is like Dan Brown.
Britney Spears on Twitter is like Dan Brown. (Probably because he uses web addresses in his writing?)
Britney Spears – Oops…I Did it Again is like Stephanie Meyer.
Jawbreaker – Kiss the Bottle is like David Foster Wallace.
Anthony Bourdain is like Dan Brown.

For what it’s worth, when you put this post through the tool, it’s like H.P. Lovecraft. Who did we leave out? Post your finds in the comments.

I Write Like Analysis

A New Use for Twitter

I’m not sure this is what Biz and Ev had in mind. Last week Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff live-blogged the execution of Ronnie Lee Gardner’s with 3 Tweets. Seems like Shurtleff is responding to criticism by digging in further. His latest Tweet? “Astonishing that no retweet whiner express outrage that Gardner shot 2 men in the face, & a cop; nor one word of empathy for their families.”

A New Use for Twitter

10 Reasons To Delete Your Facebook Account

You name your post 10 Reasons To Delete Your Facebook Account and not am I going to click, I’m probably going to link to it, too! Click through for back up to all the bullet points. #9 is pretty important, and #4 and #1 are funny. Does anyone know what % of internet users AOL had at it’s peak and how that compares to the 400 Million accounts Facebook has right now?

10. Facebook’s Terms Of Service are completely one-sided.
9. Facebook’s CEO has a documented history of unethical behavior.
8. Facebook has flat out declared war on privacy.
7. Facebook is pulling a classic bait-and-switch.
6. Facebook is a bully.
5. Even your private data is shared with applications.
4. Facebook is not technically competent enough to be trusted.
3. Facebook makes it incredibly difficult to truly delete your account.
2. Facebook doesn’t (really) support the Open Web.
1. The Facebook application itself sucks.

10 Reasons To Delete Your Facebook Account