Well, here’s the problem right here.

Keep the government out of my Medicare.

I did find one customer who had noticed the calorie labels: Dick Nigon of Sterling, Va. He and his wife, Lea, had stopped by McDonald’s after seeing an exhibit at the Renwick Gallery. Dick had ordered for the couple, noticed the calorie labels and liked them.

“I like that you have the information before you order,” he told me, when I asked about the labels. “It’s better than some kind of government health mandate in Obamacare.”

I told him that the calorie labels were, in fact, a government health mandate in Obamacare.

“Well that changes things a bit,” he responded. “I thought this was more of a voluntary sort of thing. Now I’m not quite sure how I feel about it.”

Via Balloon Juice

Well, here’s the problem right here.

2008 Election Look Back

Last year, I spent about a month putting together this 2008 Election Round Up of reactions, articles, thoughts, videos, etc. It’s fun looking back at it now and actually using it the way it was intended. It seems like a year was a long time ago and yet not that long ago. I’m not sure how many of the links are broken now, but take a look through it and pass it on.

2008 Election Look Back

You Can Not Have A Reasonable Argument With Idiots

Via Talking Points Memo, a poll from Public Policy Polling drilling down into the nonsense regarding whether President Obama is a naturalized citizen of the US.

According to the poll, 24% of the population do not believe Obama was born in the US. That’s not a huge surprise, because that’s about the % of the country that supported Bush until the end of his presidency (though, it’s obviously not certain these are the same people). More of these people (10% to 7%) believe he was born in Indonesia, rather than Kenya, which is weird because as TPM notes, everyone knows that Obama was born in Kenya, or at least that’s what they say.

Most telling, tough is the 10% of people who acknowledge Obama WAS born in Hawaii. 6% of them don’t think Hawaii is part of the US and 4% aren’t sure.

Reasonable people can disagree, sure, but these people aren’t reasonable.

You Can Not Have A Reasonable Argument With Idiots

Van Jones is in a Hurry

I read Elizabeth Kolbert’s profile of Van Jones in the New Yorker a couple months ago and was struck by what he’s doing tying the environment to the war on poverty. A couple weeks ago, the Obama administration tapped him to be the ‘green’ jobs adviser.

The profile of Jones is interesting on a couple points, Jones changed his name from Anthony to Van to create a new persona, his ability to speak to different audiences (“That was my street rap, you get to hear my élite rap later on”), and his single-minded approach to recognizing his goal.

I’m not looking for the points of difference. I’m looking for the points of commonality. I’ve trained my mind so that people can say twenty-seven things that might be objectionable, but as soon as they say one, that twenty-eighth thing, that’s in the right direction, that’s where I’m going to go in the conversation. I think that’s really important in a country as diverse as ours, to listen. So this guy, he says, I don’t want this, I don’t want that. But he says, I want everybody to be included. Well, that’s all I need. Dayenu.

The aspect I found most fascinating about Jones is how everything he says sounds like a sound bite (in a good way). I imagine this comes from his appreciation of Ronald Regan’s speaking ability.

Ronald Reagan I admire greatly. You look at what he gets away with in a speech—unbelievable. He’s able to take fairly complex prose and convey it in such a natural and conversational way that the beauty of the language and the power of the language are there, but you stay comfortable. That’s very hard to do.

I’m not the first to say this, but I know I won’t be the last. Van Jones is going to be a very big deal very soon. Mark it.

Van Jones is in a Hurry